Australian 5-piece The Trouble With Templeton are set to release their debut album Rookie on May 13th through Bella Union.

The brainchild of singer/songwriter Thomas Calder, The Trouble With Templeton have been making significant waves since 2011. The depth of their pool of inspiration ensures a dynamic blend to an album jam-packed with a distinctive energy and character.

A brave and youthful group, The Trouble With Templeton are not afraid to affect and surprise in equal measure, resulting in an album brimming with wonderfully refreshing directional changes. Calder explains.” The only prerequisite we had going in was that if we love the song and we believe in it, then we were going to record it. The element of surprise is something we really enjoy in music. You don’t want to know where a song is going after the first two lines.”

Well, it’s certainly a case of mission accomplished with Rookie in that regard.

The Trouble With Templeton have crafted an album bursting with beautifully emotive vocals. From the onset it remains adventurous, melodic and wonderfully eccentric. It’s a refreshingly self-assured sound which will leave a distinct musical taste.

The album opens with Whimpering Child. Superbly crafted and delivered, the energy radiated is one of a certain bitterness. Written from the perspective of perhaps an older gentleman, the song explores that feeling of injustice with more than a hint of self pity, when it feels as though nothing is going your way and the world and his dog are against you. And whether you’re an older gent or otherwise, this track is completely relatable. A nod to the ability of Calder to identify and connect with his audience.

You Are New highlights that directional change. This track has a much more youthful feel, exploring an unwitting change of identity through high school peer-pressure. Taking the observational overview, the song is written from the perspective of someone seeing a friend change through the influence of those around them. Delivered with a tone of certain reflection, perhaps regret, it beautifully showcases Calder’s diverse vocal range.

The album meanders it’s way from start to end, flowing through your senses in a manner which is pleasantly upbeat.

It’s the kind of record you can listen to-without listening. Until track 12, Lint. 

This track is wonderfully weird. Almost impossible do describe, it’s another well crafted song stamped with the distinctive tone and energy of the band. Seemingly written from the perspective of an insane asylum inmate, once again the tone is one of reflection, as demonstrated through the rather haunting lyric, looking through the window and seeing “so many scars wrapped in lint.” Unfortunately, I can’t shed any light on who Sebastian is!

Coming from a group well established in their native Australia, Rookie feels like an announcement to the rest of the world. For The Trouble With Templeton, this is the “here we are” moment, and it delivers.

Rookie is youthful, yet sincere. Built around Calder’s melodic, story-telling vocals, it’s enchantingly raw and beautifully heartfelt. It serves as a promising indication as to what we may come to expect from this exciting young outfit.

Beautifully crafted and superbly delivered, Rookie may prove to be an instrumental stepping-stone in the development of The Trouble With Templeton.