I’ve been listening to Hidden In The Light by Kimono Kult for the past week now, and y’wanna know something? It really bought it home to me just how incredibly bland and dull and frankly uninspired the charts really have become.

If you’re not into reality  show singers or are old enough to have a band-patch covered denim jacket that’s faded and torn because ‘it’s old, not fashionable, damnit!!!’ then you have to click several screens past the home page on the various online music portals to dig through the dross and discover some diamonds in the rough.

If I were trying to describe it to someone who digs a little deeper than the first few screens in their pursuit of playlist up their plumping with aural experimentation I’d draw comparisons to Oxide and Neutrino meeting Mad Capsule Market head on in an svengali-inspiring brawl of brain-and-body-emotion-lotion.

For those who grab whatever their friends are buying I’d say it’s the music all their friends are buying, so thorough and complete an introspective resonance the four tracks on the release feel it leaves you seeing music as something more than just making the noisey happen and being an aural conveyance of the emotional strings that bind us as one.

Much like Albarn’s Gorrilaz group Kimono Kult is the what happens when established artists with a slight avant garde leaning get together to make music. Artists such as Omar Rodriguez-Lopez of Mars Volta – whose reversal of string arrangements on  opener Todo Memos el Dolor (Everything, Anything But The Pain), leaves you feeling like a snake entwined within the charmers keel; you can feel your place in the tribe called mankind, its social subconscious and collective one-ness neither language nor distance can block nor bar.

Bosnian Rainbows Teri Gender Bender applies an untamed voice of tremulous soul espousing the detail of lyrics to the broad strokes of sound, La Cancion de Alexandra (Song Of Alexandra) bringing an anthem to end the mini-album for Teri to weave and buoy within, break surface and shine across as the rhythmic draw and pull of string-smith Laena Geronimo (Raw Geronimo) controls the direction of the storm.

Las Esposas (The Wives) unveils the musical machinations of Omar further still, a futuristic sounding line draped langoriously out for  an electro rhythm to pound out the horizon courtesy of Neurotic Yell CEO Nicole Turley.

But it is La Vida Es Una Caja Hermosa (Life Is A Beautiful Box) that will probably get most exposure to your ears from  repeated plays. With the guitarists guitarist and former Chilli Pepper axe-man John Frusciante and Dante White (Dante Vs. Zombies) building layers of landscaped mountains in the air like crunchy peanut butter coated musical Stickle-Bricks, the final track delivers a post-coital pizza fulsome repletion to draw things to a satisfying close.

And it’s with a bitter-sweet irony you will enjoy Kimono Kult and their Hiding In The Light, I fear; sweet from the adventure of that initial discovery of the group, the undulation of eructations soothing you as you take that first leap down the rabbit hole, past aural shelving filled with familiar simian-flavoured stylings and down to what lies beneath.

And ironic because we only ever get to enjoy this style of musical freedom from artists already established within their fields; unlikely to have been heard if coming from an unknown group of musicians, we should perhaps look upon Hiding In The Light as the thing of beauty that it is and what it represents.
If music had a consciousness Hiding In The Light would be its voice.

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