Cosmo Jarvis, real name Harrison Cosmo Krikoryan Jarvis, is a 22 year old singer songwriter from England.  “Think Bigger” is his latest and surprisingly, third offering. I had not heard of him before, so upon hearing opener “Love This” I was surprised to learn he was British. “Love This” sounded like something a New York garage band had conjured up and was reminiscent to The Virgins “Rich Girls”. I instantly had high hopes for the album but the further I got through it the more I became disappointed. Songs like “Train Downtown”, “Lacie” and “Good Citizen” are full on country and western songs, not what I was expecting from a 22 year old.  “Friend of the Devil” is almost embarrassing in how much my parents would like it. “Sunshine” has an edgier, angrier vibe and is probably the best track in the midst of the folk fest. On “Girl from my village” Jarvis suddenly realises he’s British as he tells the tale of a girl who has died. While it should be a touching tribute the lyrics are just too nihilistic and basic to be anything but pretty cringy. While he is extremely radio friendly and no doubt very likable to a lot of people, it’s just too country for this music snob. So stick “Love this” on repeat and leave the rest of the album to the golden oldies!

Paula Kenny Cosmo Jarvis, real name Harrison Cosmo Krikoryan Jarvis, is a 22 year old singer songwriter from England.  “Think Bigger” is his latest and surprisingly, third offering. I had not heard of him before, so upon hearing opener “Love This” I was surprised to learn he was British. “Love This” sounded like something a New York garage band had conjured up and was reminiscent to The Virgins “Rich Girls”. I instantly had high hopes for the album but the further I got through it the more I became disappointed. Songs like “Train Downtown”, “Lacie” and “Good Citizen” are full on country and western songs, not what I was expecting from a 22 year old.  “Friend of the Devil” is almost embarrassing in how much my parents would like it. “Sunshine” has an edgier, angrier vibe and is probably the best track in the midst of the folk fest. On “Girl from my village” Jarvis suddenly realises he’s British as he tells the tale of a girl who has died. While it should be a touching tribute the lyrics are just too nihilistic and basic to be anything but pretty cringy. While he is extremely radio friendly and no doubt very likable to a lot of people, it’s just too country for this music snob. So stick “Love this” on repeat and leave the rest of the album to the golden oldies!

Paula Kenny